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After watching him on Fox News a good number of times over the years, I can’t say I’m surprised.

He was always disappointing on Fox News and I always thought they could get a better representative of the Catholic Faith.

Too bad when the Church is already in a crisis period that we have a well-known priest do something like this. One wonders how much of this goes back to the corrupt seed of their founder and the manipulation used by the Legion to strong arm young men into the Legion and the priesthood.

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Great New Didache Bible from Ignatius Press

by Steve Ray on May 18, 2019

The Didache Bible Is Here, Article by Dr. Jeff Mirus

[Steve’s Comment]: I posted this a while ago, but want to make sure new readers are aware of this excellent new Bible with the right footnotes, maps, etc. This is my choice.

[Miras’ article]: This Bible uses the Second Edition of the Catholic Edition of the Revised Standard Version, widely regarded as the best translation available today. This means it was last revised according to the principles promulgated in Liturgiam Authenticam in 2001. The printing is well done—clean, clear and easy to read—and the accompanying commentary and additional resources are superb. However, the prospective reader needs to realize that this edition’s resources are primarily devoted to highlighting and clarifying the teachings and practices of the Church as found in the Word of God and as more fully articulated in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

didacheRSVThis purpose was inspired by the Midwest Theological Forum’s Didache Series of religious education textbooks, and it makes this edition of the Bible the best one to use in connection with religious education, or by readers who want to understand both the teachings of the Church and their foundations in Sacred Scripture. It would not be the best edition for those who know Catholic doctrine very well and are now interested in exploring the origins and development of the Biblical books, the surrounding history with which the texts interact, or the full range of perspectives on the meaning of difficult passages.

The Didache Bible includes the following preparatory resources as front-matter:

  • Foreword by Cardinal Francis George on the general relationships among the Catechism, Vatican II’s Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation, and Sacred Scripture.
  • Preface by Fr. James Socias of the Midwest Theological Forum on the fundamental purposes of this edition.
  • Introduction on Biblical inspiration and the various senses of Scripture.
  • A brief guide on how to read the Bible.
  • A brief summary of the major themes of all the books of the Old and New Testaments.
  • A chronology of the Old Testament.
  • A chronology of the New Testament.
  • A thematically-organized list of Scripture passages for personal meditation.

Of even greater interest are the resources which accompany each of the books. There is a one-page introduction to each book which covers authorship, dating, audience and main themes. Then, page by page as the Biblical text unfolds, we find:

  • Extensive commentary, verse by verse, on the meaning of the text and its significance for understanding Catholic teaching and practice.
  • Call-out boxes which briefly highlight key Biblical and theological concepts to aid the reader in understanding the full significance of the text.
  • Lists of related Biblical passages (these cross-references visually separate the text from the commentary).
  • Periodic full-page apologetical explanations of important Catholic concepts, teachings and practices, placed at appropriate points along the way. There are over 100 of these longer explanations.

Finally, following the last book of the Bible, the back-matter includes:

  • 24 full-color maps providing geographical orientations for both the Old and New Testaments.
  • A 44-page glossary of Biblical names and terms.
  • Index to the maps.
  • Index of apologetical explanations by title.
  • Index of apologetical explanations by subject.
  • A 23-page index of subjects, including Biblical names, which leads to the Biblical passages in which they appear.

I’ve attached two rough, home-made double-page scans. One shows pages from the Book of Genesis as an example of the presentation of the text, the Biblical cross-references, the extensive commentary, and the boxed highlights. The other shows pages from the Book of Revelation as an example of how an apologetical explanation (on the Rosary) interfaces with a page of text (again with its characteristic chapter and verse numbers, subtitles, cross-references and commentary).

The Didache Bible is currently available in a sturdy hardbound edition with two ribbons. I give this Bible my highest recommendation for all those who wish to understand both Sacred Scripture and Catholic teaching more fully, including the deep links between the two. I would say it is the best edition to give as a first Bible to Catholics who have not yet made an extensive study of their Faith. It is the ideal Bible for them to have when they go off to college or out into the world, where they will eventually be challenged—not least about the relationship between Sacred Scripture and the Catholic Church.

I have provided our usual Amazon link below, but the Bible is currently on sale directly from Ignatius Press. I am checking on the availability of the deluxe leather-bound edition that was also originally planned.

The Didache Bible     $35.00

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Screen Shot 2017-11-24 at 12.50.42 PM7 Reasons to Study the Cultural Backgrounds of the Bible

Posted by  on 09/06/2017 in Olive Tree Blog

1. Understand the audience: Grasping the original audience’s perspective helps us understand the setting to which the inspired authors communicated their message.

2. Understand how the text communicates: A text is ideas linked by threads of writing. Each phrase and each word communicates by the ideas and thoughts that they will trigger in the reader or hearer.

3. Biblical writers made assumptions: Biblical writers normally could take for granted that their audiences shared their language and culture; some matters, therefore, they assumed rather than stated. Think about what happens when later audiences from different cultures read the text without the same un-stated understandings as the original audience.

2006AA75524. Understand the differences: We can see the differences between [ancient people] and us. To better understand how they would have interpreted what was being shared to them.

5. Understand what issues were being addressed: When we hear the message in its authentic, original cultural setting we can reapply it afresh for our own different setting most fully, because we understand what issues were really being addressed.

6. Prevent imposing your own culture: If we know nothing of the ancient world, we will be inclined to impose our own culture and worldview on the Biblical text. This will always be detrimental to our understanding.

7. Fill in the gaps: As each person hears or reads the text, the message takes for granted underlying gaps that need to be filled with meaning by the audience. It is theologically essential that we fill [the gaps] appropriately.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church summarizes this beautifully as follows:

109 In Sacred Scripture, God speaks to man in a human way. To interpret Scripture correctly, the reader must be attentive to what the human authors truly wanted to affirm and to what God wanted to reveal to us by their words.

needle110 In order to discover the sacred authors’ intention, the reader must take into account the conditions of their time and culture, the literary genres in use at that time, and the modes of feeling, speaking, and narrating then current. “For the fact is that truth is differently presented and expressed in the various types of historical writing, in prophetical and poetical texts, and in other forms of literary expression.”\

Catholic Church, Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2nd Ed. (Washington, DC: United States Catholic Conference, 2000), 32.

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Last Day Parts 1 & 2: Via Dolorosa, Calvary, Mass at Tomb, Dancing in Bethlehem, Farewells

May 17, 2019

Our last day here in Israel was packed with events including free time. The climax of our trip was the Via Dolorosa and touching the top of Calvary where the blood of Jesus flowed. After that we had a tour of the church of the Holy Sepulchre before we had Mass with the Franciscans at […]

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How We REALLY Got the Bible – the Facts Simply Presented (print this out, hand it out)

May 16, 2019

This is just one page of Bob Sullivan’s excellent little tri-fold handout to explain how we got the Bible. It is from the Catholic and historical perspective without all the Protestant biases and twisting of history. I think you enjoy the whole thing which you can see here. You can print this out, fold it […]

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Day 7: Mass at Gethsemane, Mount of Olives, Upper Room, Mount Zion, Shroud Exhibit and more

May 15, 2019

In summary, today was surrounding the Mount of Olives and Mount Zion. We started with Mass at Gethsemane which for many people is the most moving site on the trip (homily here). Up to the Paternoster where Jesus taught his disciples to pray the Our Father and Ascended into Heaven. Upper Room and Church of […]

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Todd Meade Story: From Southern Baptist Liberty University to Catholic

May 15, 2019

    Every spiritual life is a journey. Mine began in Warner Robins, Georgia in 1971. I was born into a good Methodist family and had a strong Christian foundation laid for me in childhood. But unfortunately, as is all too common, during my teenage years I drifted away somewhat from this good foundation and was […]

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Day 6: Museum, Jericho, Jordan River, Qumran, Dead Sea and Camels

May 14, 2019

This is more of a fun day.  We had Mass to start the day at the Notre Dame chapel (homily here).  We visit the Israel museum to see the city of Jerusalem on a small scale from the time of Christ. We also see the Dead Sea Scrolls before descending down into the Judean wilderness […]

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What Happened to the Apostles after the New Testament?

May 14, 2019

 

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Day 5: Bethlehem all day AND Solemn Entry into Tomb

May 13, 2019

Today we spent the whole day in Bethlehem and had Mass in a cave. Again the homily was exceptional. We visited the Church of the Nativity to touch the Birthplace of Christ and spent time shopping and supporting the local Christians. We drove to the Promenade where I told my “Story of Salvation History from Adam […]

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Is there Evidence for Jesus outside the Bible?

May 13, 2019

Some people may think Jesus is a mythical figure like Santa Claus or the Easter Bunny. Others think Jesus might be historical but only mentioned in the Bible is the only source of information on the existence of Jesus. They question whether Jesus really existed as a real historical figure. Is the Bible the only […]

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Day 4: Capernaum, Boat Ride, Eating St.Peters Fish, Visitation & Arrival in Jerusalem!

May 12, 2019

Today is the big transition from a Galilee to Jerusalem. We only move once during our pilgrimages for the convenience of the people. This morning was all about the Sea of Galilee where we had Mass at Capernaum where Jesus said “Eat My Flesh, Drink My Blood.” The readings were from John chapter 6 – […]

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The Eucharist: the Flesh Profits Nothing

May 12, 2019

Since we are in Capernaum today, I decided to share a few words related to the site. I was recently asked a related questions questionic Answers Live. Capernaum is where Jesus said “Eat My Flesh; Drink My Blood.” I thought it would be appropriate to answer an e-mail I received a while ago from a man named […]

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Beatitudes, Caesarea Philippi, Golan Heights, Syrian Border, Galilee & Gastronomic Heaven

May 11, 2019

On our third day here in the Holy Land we spent the day in the north. Mass at Beatitudes (homily here). One of the highlights was visiting Caesarea Philippi where Jesus said “You Are Peter and on This Rock I Will Build My Church…” Steve gave his talk “Peter: the Rock & Keys.” We  stopped […]

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Interesting Explanation of Baptism from Protestant Dictionary – “baptism…in itself is unimportant”

May 11, 2019

I was looking up Greek definitions of the word baptism and found this interesting “definition.” This dictionary is usually very good but I found this summary of biblical passages on baptism very intriguing and disingenuous. Take a look at this definition and think about it for yourself. Analyze it and the verses used. Notice how they […]

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Excellent Journal of all Aspects of our Pilgrimages to the Holy Land

May 11, 2019

If you want to read an excellent journal and recap of one of our Holy Land pilgrimages, you will love reading these insightful well-written entries covering all aspects of the trip. Glenn Juday is a scientist, scholar and writer. He covers things from safety to biblical understandings, from the people he met to sites we […]

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