Wednesday, November 28, 2018

I wish we had Catholic cities like this in the United States. San Miguel de Allende is full of churches and convents and generous kind people. We took an amazing walking tour through the city learning many of the secrets and surprises of the present and the past.

Then we went to the Sanctuary at Atotonilco which is a church that has tens of thousands of Mexicans come for prayer and the Saint Ignatius exercises every year. You won’t believe the paintings and the intricate story of the life of Christ on the walls and ceiling’s and even a three dimensional Passion.

We had another wonderful Mass here and you can hear/see the excellent homily of Fr. James here. Enjoy!

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Bishops Among the Flames in Mexico

by Steve Ray on November 28, 2018

Here in Mexico churches have 3 dimensional images of purgatory to scare people to holiness. Nearly every one has a bishop in the flames.

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Holding Hands at Mass

by Steve Ray on November 28, 2018

My wife Janet and I always cringe at a new parish when it comes time for the Our Father. We quickly bow our heads and close our eyes; I clutch my hands close to my chest (and she does the same) and we start to pray — hoping some aggressive hand-holder doesn’t reach over and insist on tearing my hands apart so I can warmly hold theirs during the prayer.

Once, I even had a nun nudge me, see my hesitation  and them smiling reach out and  taunt me — “Pleeeease?”  I conceded out of love and duty and afterwards she smiled knowingly and say, “Thaaaank you!”

Karl Keating has a few things to say about hand-holding at Mass which I produce here for others who close their eyes and clutch their hands close to their chests.

ORIGINS OF HAND-HOLDING

Mass_holding_hands[In a recent] issue of the “Adoremus Bulletin” it says this in response to a query from a priest in the Bronx:

“No gesture for the people during the Lord’s Prayer is mentioned in the official documents. The late liturgist Fr. Robert Hovda promoted holding hands during this prayer, a practice he said originated in Alcoholics Anonymous. Some ‘charismatic’ groups took up the practice.”

My long-time sense had been that hand-holding at the Our Father was an intrusion from charismaticism, but I had not been aware of the possible connection with AA. If this is the real origin of the practice, it makes it doubly odd: first, because hand-holding intrudes a false air of chumminess into the Mass (and undercuts the immediately-following sign of peace), and second, because modifications to liturgical rites ought to arise organically and not be borrowed from secular self-help groups.

Periodically, on “Catholic Answers Live” I am asked about hand-holding during Mass and explain that it is contrary to the rubrics. Usually I get follow-up e-mails from people who say, “But it’s my favorite part of the Mass” or “We hold hands as a family, and it makes us feel closer.”

About the latter I think, “It’s good to feel close as a family, but you can hold hands at home or at the mall. The Mass has a formal structure that should be respected. That means you forgo certain things that you might do on the outside.”

About the former comment I think, “If this is the high point of the Mass for you, you need to take Remedial Mass 101. The Mass is not a social event. It is the re-presentation of the sacrifice of Calvary, and it is the loftiest form of prayer. It should be attended with appropriate solemnity.”

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