Protestant and other Christians

Steve at Wittenberg Door in Germany

Martin Luther and the Protestant “Reformation” – or rather, “the Deformation”  Just back from a trip to Martin Luther sites in Germany, Steve Ray discusses the man, his ideas, and his effect on the Church.

(PICTURE: Steve posting “500 Reasons to Be Catholic” on the Wittenberg Door in Wittenberg Germany. To watch the 2-minute video of the event, click here.

Click here to listen or download.

1.  Regarding the “reformers”, Romans 8 sounds like predestination so can Steve please give some clarification on that topic?

2.  In recent times the Pope and others honor Martin Luther? Is the Pope a heretic? How should we respond?

3.  What does it mean for the Church to be “apostolic”? How can I explain it to my Protestant friends who think they have it too?

4.  Why didn’t the Church stop Luther?

5.  The Church was corrupt at the time of the Reformation which is why Luther was able to do what he did, correct?

6.  What is the definition of a heretic? How are Protestants not heretics if they believe what Luther believed?

7.  Did the Catholic theologians of the time argue with Luther, especially defending Apostolic Succession in order to demonstrate that Luther was wrong?

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Germany Trip Summary, Comments, Farewells and Departure

by Steve Ray on September 15, 2017

After eight days of intense touring of Germany and following all the sites of Martin Luther and the “Protestant Devolution” we finally said our goodbyes, shared our comments about the trip and headed home. But the trip was not only about Martin Luther and the Protestant rebellion. We also explored and toured the life of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, understood World War II, the Nazi and Soviet Communist eras, the divided Berlin and the suffering of the people behind the Iron Curtain. The trip was also kind of like EWTN’s show The Journey Home with lots of conversion and vocation stories along the way including our local guide Klara who was an atheist in Czechoslovakia and has recently become a Catholic. But it was also a beautiful tour of Germany which is full of history, rustic castles, idyllic rivers and villages, old churches and excellent food and drink. We learned a lot and even though I knew much about Martin Luther and the whole Protestant situation I think I doubled my knowledge by visiting all the sites and sharing the information among the group and especially with Ken Hensley’s excellent teaching. For those who want to learn more about Martin Luther, John Calvin and the whole Protestant revolt visit www.kennethhensley.com. More than half of the people on this trip it traveled with us before and again we bonded into a very close group of friends. There was no wrangling or discontentment among the group at all. It was smooth and harmonious and full of personal and spiritual growth and development. Everyone’s faith was deepened in the conviction that the Catholic Church contains the fullness of the truth and is, in fact, the church that Jesus founded 2000 years ago and that Martin Luther introduced a great rupture into that unity which has brought chaos into the modern Western world. We especially enjoyed celebrating Mass with these holy priests in cities that have become radically Lutheran. We again proclaimed the truth of the Catholic faith in the cities that have been deprived in many ways through their protest and separation from the unity of the one, holy, Catholic and apostolic church. I think we were the only Catholic group to take a trip like this on the 500 anniversary of the “Protestant Reformation”. I’m certainly glad that we planned and executed this trip and it was a marvelous experience for all of us.  We expect to do this trip again in about five years.

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Today we visited the city of Worms Germany where Martin Luther was called before the “Diet” or Tribunal of the Holy Roman Empire at the “Diet of Worms” in 1521.

I know that sounds funny and kind of disgusting but a “diet” was a tribunal and it was held in the city of Worms in Germany. We celebrated Mass there at the Church of Our Lady (Homily Part 1 and last 2 1/2 minutes of homily here).

We visited that site today and learned more about Luther from Ken and other conversion stories and had fun along the way. Klara our guide told us her story of growing up atheist in Communist Czechoslovakia and recently discovered the Catholic Church.

On the way back to our hotel we drove along the beautiful Rhine River with all of the vineyards and mountains and castles.

We also had our farewell dinner tonight with lots of comments and laughter and fun.

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Germany 7: Protestants Argue in Marburg Castle, a Birthday Party and more

September 13, 2017

Today we visited Marburg which is a quaint and historic town with the beautiful Bavarian looking houses and buildings. No one wanted to leave. Up on the mountain was the castle of Marburg where Luther, Melanchthon, Zwingli and a large group Protestants gathered to try and hammer out the “Protestant theology.” I explain more in […]

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Bach Concert, Luther House and Wartburg Castle

September 12, 2017

We started the day in Eisenach Germany with Mass at the Church of St. Elizabeth. She was an amazing woman well before the time of Luther who cared for the poor in an exceptional and miraculous way. You can hear the excellent homily here (Part 1 and Part 2). Today we branched out a bit […]

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He said, “You know you’re going to hell, right!”

September 11, 2017

As we entered the Luther Museum in Luther’s childhood hometown of Mansfeld a group of American Lutherans were leaving. They were all excited at first to meet Americans and asked where we were from. I said we were from all across the country. He then asked what Lutheran Synod we were from and I told […]

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Luther’s Young Years, Monastery and Birth & Death

September 11, 2017

Eisleben: birth and baptism of Luther. Also where he preach his last sermons and died. This was also the town of St. Gertrude the Great. We has Mass at St. Gertrude’s with another fantastic homily. Mansfeld: Luther’s childhood home and church where he sang in the choir and served as an altar boy. He was […]

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